Category Archives: Craft Services

FB_IMG_1426431004336My name is Jane Thramer/Willwerth. In 2009, I was a 30-year-old single mother who decided to move to Massachusetts to pursue a job in craft service for Local 481. With the tax incentive in full swing, I had to give it a try.

With hard work and perseverance, I started my own craft service company in 2011. I remarried a local Medford man in 2012, inherited two more children (one of whom works for me), and bought a home in Saugus in 2013. Since then, my business has grown from one truck to three with steady work and great employees. I absolutely love my job and the wealth it spreads to other local companies in Massachusetts. I have worked on countless feature films, commercials, and TV pilots over the last few years.

To try to understand how much I spend on local businesses is unfathomable. In 2011, I spent over $150,000 at mom-and-pop restaurants, grocery stores, convenience stores, and auto repair places for just two feature films alone.

To list just a few, here are some of the places MASS FILM JOBS HAVE HELPED:

CHAMPIONS – PEABODY
JOES FAMOUS – ROXBURY
BOB’S – MEDFORD
TOM YUM KOONG III – NEWTON
ANMOL – BEVERLEY
TERIYAKI HOUSE – SOUTH BOSTON
LENDYS DELI – SAUGUS
PANERA BREAD FRANCHISES – SAUGUS, ALLSTON, BOSTON, ETC..
J. PACE AND SONS
COSTCO
BJ’S WHOLESALE
REASTURANT DEPOT
STOP AND SHOP
HANNAFORDS
SHAWS
UPTOWN DELI – WILMINGTON
PIZZA MIA- WILMINGOTN
SAUGUS DELI
BIG JOES DEPOT – WILMINGTON
JADE PACIFICA – READING
TUMBLE INN DINER – SAUGUS
BAGELS AND BEYOND – READING
BAGEL WORLD- PEABODY AND READING
WHOLEFOODS
TRADER JOES
SYSCO
BOSTON BEAN COFFEE
SUNKIN DONUTS
HONEY DEW
STARBUCKS
AGAVE MEXCIAN
ALL STAR PIZZA
BOULOVARD DINER – BOSTON
BORRELLIES – HAVERHILL
CHIPOLTE
ON THE BORDER -WOBURN
BAJA FISH TACO FOOD TRUCK – BOSTON
NEW ENGLAND COD SQUAD FOOD TRUCK- BOSTON
TERI YUM YUM FOOD TRUCK – BOSTON
COOKIE MONSTER FOOD TRUCK- BOSTON
STANS COFFEE TRIKE SERVICE – BOSTON
NADINES CUPCAKE TRUCK – READING
DAIRY DOME – STONEHAM
ANTHONYS DELI – STONEHAM
DOUGH BOY- BOSTON
EDIBLE ARRANGMENTS
EVANS DELI- SWAMPSCOTT
FATINI BAKERY- HAVERHILL
FELICAS – STONEHAM
FLOUR BAKERY – BOSTON
KITTYS – N. READING
FOODIES – BOSTON
GREEN BEAN FOOD TRUCK – BOSTON
GOOD DAY CAFE – NORTH ANDOVER
KINGS PIZZERIA – SAUGUS
HAPPY TACO FOOD TRUCK – GLUOSTER
HEAVENLEY DONUTS – READING
LOCAL ICE CREAM TRUCKS
PLATE GORMET – NEWTON
PHILS GALLY GRILL- SWAMPSCOTT
UPPERCRUST- BOSTON
REGINA PIZZERIA
POLCARIS – WOBURN
KANES DONUTS- SAUGUS
KAYMEN HOTDOG VENUE – CHELSEA
CHARLEIS PIZZERIA – SAUGUS
KOWLOONS – SAUGUS
LA CASIAS – MEDFORD
RAZZOS – MEDFORD
MARKET BASKET
U ME SUSHI- STONEHAM
TWO PISSANOS
SWEET THINGS
SANTARPIOS – BOSTON
ROYS DELI
ROXY GRILL CHEESE FOOD TRUCK- BOSTON
ROCHE BROS- NEWTON
PRIDES PIZZA
POLAR SELTZER CO.
PF CHANGS
CHEESE CAKE FACTORY
NEW BRIDGE CAFE- CHELSEA
LIBERTY BELL- STONEHAM
LILAC HOUSE – NEWTON
M&M FOOD TRUCK – BOSTON
WHALBURGERS
TRIUNFO MEXICAN
POLAND SPRING
MOUNTIAN VALLY SPRING WATER CO
MR TAKE OUT
AND ON AND ON AND ON>>>>>>>

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My name is Joe Fantasia. I was born and raised in Massachusetts. I’m a lifelong resident and have been a homeowner in Dracut, MA, for the last nine years. Like many people in Massachusetts, I nearly lost my home five years ago because of a job loss due to a down economy. If not for my work in the film industry, I would have for sure lost my home.

Over the last four years, I have worked on several movies in craft service as a member of Local 481. Craft service provides food, beverages, and snacks for the cast and crew throughout the filming day. Because our filming days are very long, craft service will provide two pass-around meals per day. The first pass-around is usually three hours after we start and the second is usually three hours after catering serves lunch. If the filming day goes more then six hours after lunch, craft service will provide what is called “second meal.” We work in different cities and towns all over the state and always order our pass-arounds from local restaurants and lots of family-owned businesses.

We create a lot of excitement when we walk into a business and order 180 sandwiches for our cast and crew. Just last night we ordered from Nick’s Roast Beef in Beverly, MA, and the bill came to $1,000. On other recent movies, we have ordered from Floramos, Santarpios, Bill and Bob’s Roast Beef, Sparky’s Wings, Kowloons, South Street Diner, Kings Pizza, Regina’s Pizza, and Taste of Brazil, to name just a few. Lots of times we place orders and the restaurants don’t even know who the order is for; from now on, though, we will make sure that they are all aware that it is for the film industry.

Our coffee machines and specialty coffee come from Boston Bean, from whom we just got a $2,400 order of coffee this week. We have fresh produce delivered to our truck every week. Every day, we have fresh muffins and bagels from Panera and sometimes donuts from Kane’s.  I can only talk about craft service, which is just one element of money being spent by the film industry in the local economy. Just think about the cost of materials for building sets for the movies or the cost to supply fuel for for all of the productions trucks — costs that are funneled into the Massachusetts economy.

Local 481 has close to 900 members, and most of us will be working later this month when there are four movies filming at the same. Also, the teamsters from Local 25 will be providing the transportation and will have hundreds of members working as well. Also working on these movies are local actors and actresses and people in production who may or may not be union members who are employed by the film industry as well.

Governor Baker and staff, we urge you to look closer at this and fully understand economic impact of the film industry before eliminating the tax incentive.

We are the people who work on the other side of the camera. We are not movie stars, but hardworking blue-collar men and women who have been virtually unknown. Now it is time for us to speak up and be heard!

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My name is Ethan Fox. My wife Tracy and I live in Walpole, MA. Together we provide craft services to local production crews that film in Massachusetts. Opportunities created by the film incentive gave us the confidence to start a craft service company, FoxCraft, almost ten years ago, and we are proud to call it our own. We started a family six years ago, and continue to give both our family and our small business everything we have so that it can sustain us and our now two children.

The dollars we are budgeted to spend are OUR responsibility and are NOT taken lightly. To prove that the film tax incentives are working, we spend our budgets at mom-and-pop businesses, small business like our own, business that are unmistakably Massachusetts-owned and -operated, ones we find off the beaten path, and that are grateful and appreciative of the business.

We pride ourselves in passing the monies on to the little guys. It’s one of our ways of helping better others. Having been fortunate to service a handful of productions, we’ve traversed the state and met incredible taxpaying people who truly are grateful for the business we give them. To us, it’s a badge of honor and a reward to be able to show off the quality, locally made products, as well as the character, tradition, and pride of local businessmen and women. It’s what keeps people coming back! The positive impact is undeniable!

Work was created by the film tax incentives, and our life, family, and career have taken off thanks to it. Please don’t destroy the jobs we count on. Allow them to continue creating opportunities!

Film tax incentives BROUGHT business to town, and opportunity keeps knocking for thousands of extremely hardworking and talented craftsmen.It’s working!

Don’t give up on the thousands of skilled laborers that the film tax incentive supports. Our hard work and dedication keep us persevering with what we have, but the economic stimulus that the film incentives created and continue to create are immeasurable. Don’t close the doors on the livelihoods of thousand of people working hard everyday to maximize the opportunities you’ve afforded us. When jobs leave the state, families are pressed to leave and “follow the work.” Keep our families together by leaving the tax incentives in place. Thank you in advance for taking my family’s well-being to heart and leaving the film tax incentives in place.

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We are Team Crafty, a thriving new Massachusetts-based craft service company that was created directly due to the Massachusetts Film Tax Credit four years ago. Started by Framingham-born Dave Steinwachs and Dedham-born Cameron Goodrich, Team Crafty serves gourmet snacks to the cast and crew of movie and television productions.

Due to our job, we have a direct line to every community we film in and numerous local businesses within those communities. We spend money, plain and simple. Production companies come into town and literally give us thousands of dollars every day to spend within the state. We have the duty of feeding a large amount of people and are always in need of more food. That food ALWAYS comes from whatever community we happen to be filming in that day.
Whether it’s Boston Bagel Company in Southie for our deli meats and bagels, Lamberts in Dorchester for all of our fruit, The Mandarin in Reading for second meals, LaRonga Bakery in Somerville for a lot of our baked goods, numerous food trucks like Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, The Cookie Monstah, Captain Martins Seafood, and Kick-Ass Cupcakes, or Kane’s Donuts in Saugus for our “Fat Kid Friday” spread every Friday, we use local vendors for all of our food needs. We do also shop at the larger stores, like Stop & Shop, Market Basket, Roche Bros., and BJ’s Wholesale Club for a lot of our goods, spending thousands –even millions — of dollars every year at these chains. Although we definitely use the larger businesses, we have made a massive push to use as many small local businesses and vendors as possible, because that’s who we are and that’s who we support. Time and time again, these small businesses let us know how much of an impact we’ve had on their day, week, month, and even their entire year. Many of these vendors have even been able to expand their businesses, hire more people, and open new locations due to the money they have made directly from the film industry.

This industry has allowed so many working families of Massachusetts to make a solid, honest living, following their passion for making movies. It has allowed many of these people to start small businesses of their own, within and outside of the industry, solely from the money that they have earned due to the film tax incentive. It has allowed these people to buy homes, purchase cars, and support their families. The only reason why these people have been able to do so is the film tax incentive.

Many producers are quite open about admitting that they are only here because of the tax break. To get rid of it would kill thousands of jobs, ruin many up-and-coming small businesses, and take a very large chunk of business away from many local vendors. The positive impact this industry has brought to Massachusetts is too impressive to ignore. We truly hope for the sake of our coworkers and their families, our local vendors, the thousands of people directly affected by the incentive, and our own business and livelihood, Massachusetts will reconsider eliminating the film tax incentive. Plain and simple, Films=Jobs.

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My name is John Burke. I’ve worked in the movie and television industry in Massachusetts since 2007. Most people know me for working craft service, which is the department that provides snacks, drinks, and smiles for the cast and crew throughout the day. Spending thousands of dollars each week, all of our supplies, food, beverages, etc. are bought directly from local Massachusetts vendors, all of them extremely happy and appreciative of our patronage and we of their businesses.

I myself was born and raised in Medford, MA. I was married, had my daughter (my wife helped), and bought my house in Medford, MA. All of my paychecks from the movies, TV shows, and commercials I work on helped with much of this and every day go right into my community.

All of my paychecks are possible because of the tax incentive. The tax incentive also allows me to go home to my family at the end of the day and sleep in my own bed. The Massachusetts film tax incentive is GREAT for the PEOPLE of Massachusetts. Please, don’t let it go away.

KHirsch saveMAfilmjobsMy name is Karen Hirsch and I do craft service. I’ve been a “crafty” for three-plus years, but I’ve been in this business for 30 years. I started my own business in 1985, called New England Film Freelancers, a scheduling service for freelancers in the film industry. It was a relatively young and small community just starting to grow. Around the same time, I helped my husband, Jim Hirsch (an LD/gaffer), and his business partner, John Cini, start their companies, High Output, Inc. and Charles River Studios. Within six years, I had started a family, and NEFF phased out as a new company, Central Booking Service, became New England’s go-to service for freelancers in the biz. As the film industry has grown, I’ve worked for High Output both in the office and on location. My love for food, cooking, and throwing a good party led me to my current job doing craft service.

As a craft service person, I work on TV commercials and movies. My job includes shopping and supporting local shops and restaurants buying food, snacks, and drinks to serve all day to the cast and crew.

I live in Brookline; craft service is my job; and my husband’s job and business is our livelihood. Individual features are temporary, and our jobs are permanent. Keeping the film tax incentives will allow us, the thousands of people in the industry, and all the businesses we support, to stay in Massachusetts.

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My name is David Abate, and I have been working in the film industry for the past seven years. I work in the craft service field.

We are responsible for feeding the cast and crew (mostly residents of Massachusetts) throughout the day. To do this, we spend lot of money with local stores and restaurants. To give you an example of this, let me tell you about one day of buying from local business:

One recent Friday, I started my day by stopping off at Donna’s Donuts, where I spent $60 on breakfast items. After going to the set and getting my table set, I headed out to purchase over $600 worth of snacks. I then headed to the grocery store where I spent another $200 dollars on milk, fruit, bread, and other various items. Later that day, we accepted a delivery order for another $1,000 dollars of food product. On set this same day, we got our coffee delivery from Boston Bean for around $300. We ended the day by bringing in a food truck to serve tacos to the cast and crew. The bill for this was $2,800. That’s six companies that are all local businesses that also employ locals.

We spent almost $5,000 on this one day. We work five days a week (sometimes six!) and will be filming for nine weeks. Now tell me we don’t support the local economy. Save the tax incentive and save our jobs.

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